WEBINAR FOR GAPS PRACTITIONERS

Updated: Feb 2


Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride

Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride is the physician who has pioneered the use of the Gut and Psychology Syndrome Diet for helping children with intractable digestive issues. She and one of her practitioners, Becky Plotner, asked me to do an online presentation about ACC chelation for GAPS practitioners all over the world. The following is what I had to say.


Good day to you all , wherever you are in the world. My name is Rebecca Lee and I am, along with Andy Cutler, Phd., the coauthor of the recently published book, The Mercury Detoxification Manual. Andy also published 2 other books: Amalgam Illness, Diagnosis and Treatment and Hairtest Interpretation, Finding Hidden Toxicities about chronic mercury poisoning and how to interpret hair tests.


When Amalgam Illness was written 20 years ago, Andy calculated that between 1 to 6% of the population had enough mercury in them to disrupt their body’s biochemistry and make them sick. Before he died two years ago, I asked him what he thought that number was now and he answered, closer to 30 to 50%. That means that since you are practitioners of one kind or another and deal with sick people, probably all of your patients have this issue.


For me, mercury is “the unified field theory” toxin behind this holocaust of idiopathic chronic illness in the world today. Digestive issues, neurological issues, autoimmune diseases and on and on. Chronic diseases that, in conventional medicine, nobody knows what causes and for which there are only powerful pharmaceutical drugs to control symptoms.


Andy Cutler, who came up with the protocol which we have described in the new book, was a chemistry PhD with his degree from Princeton University. He got involved with this issue because he became poisoned himself from some amalgam dental work that was placed below his gum line, with access to his blood system. He developed allergies and food sensitivities, but for him the worst thing was that his intellect stopped working. And he was a person with a Mensa Society level IQ.


Like most of us who got poisoned this way, he spent a few years going from doctor to doctor. Finally, what he affectionately referred to as a “voodoo doctor” took the risk of telling him what was wrong. I say “took the risk,” because that practitioner subsequently got into trouble with his medical board.